CAPCOM

Aurora Seven, do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Go ahead, Indian Cap Com.

CAPCOM

Our medical monitor says that we are reading your respiration. I believe this is almost the first time it's come across.

Scott Carpenter

That's very good. I guarantee I'm breathing.

CAPCOM

Roger. Understand.

Scott Carpenter

The eye patch is in place, this time.

Scott Carpenter

Going to record—record only at this time.

Scott Carpenter

At 3 hours and 48 minutes and 51 seconds elapsed, I'm taking a good swig of water. It's pretty cool this time. Stretching my legs a tad. It's quite dark. I'm in drifting flight. Oh, boy! It feels good to get that leg stretched out. That one and the right one too.

Scott Carpenter

I drank an awful lot of water and I'm still thirsty. As a matter of fact, I think there— there is a leak in the urinal, I'm sure.

Scott Carpenter

Okay. I'm shaking my head violently from all sides, with eyes closed, up and down, pitch, roll, yaw. Nothing in my stomach; nothing anywhere. There is now—I will try to poke zero, time zero button. Well, I missed it. I was a little disoriented as to exactly where things are, not sure exactly what you want to accomplish by this but there is no problem of orienting. Your—your—inner ears and your mental appraisal of horizontal, you just adapt to this environment, like—like you were born in it. It's a great, great freedom.

Note

The result of this test is the same under 1g and he describes no difficulty in re-establishing relationships.

Scott Carpenter

Don't let me forget about the shiny finish on the star chart. It makes it very hard to read.

Scott Carpenter

I'm using the photometer now—to try and get—a reading. I saw a com—no, it's the balloon that I see, still drifting aimlessly, lighted by moonlight at this time.

Scott Carpenter

None of the colors are—particularly visible. I think—

Scott Carpenter

Excess cabin water light is on at this time, 03 56 24. Am going to turn it down just a tad— so it will be just about where the suit is. I would say, let's see, from that, that it jumped down to freezing.

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Muchea Cap Com, Aurora Seven. Loud and clear. How me?

CAPCOM

Coming in loud and clear.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. Deke, my control mode is manual; gyros are caged; the maneuver switch is off. My fuel reads 45 and 42 [percent]; the oxygen is reading 76 and 100 [percent]; steam vent temperatures are 68 [degrees] on the suit and I just got excess cabin water light; the needle dropped down to 20. Reset cabin water at about 6 and in this capsule it seems optimum settings are right between 6 and 7. Outside of that, all things, all systems are good. And blood pressure is starting now.

CAPCOM

Roger. Okay, starting blood pressure.

Scott Carpenter

The visor has been open for some time, I've been taking some readings on stars through the haze layer with the photometer. The visor is coming closed now.

CAPCOM

Roger. Understand visor coming closed.

CAPCOM

I'll give you retro time for end of mission and would like to have you set the clock to this at this time.

Scott Carpenter

Understand, 04 32 34.

Scott Carpenter

Okay. It's going into the clock now—whoop.

CAPCOM

We indicate 35.

Scott Carpenter

I do, too. I overshot. Stand by.

CAPCOM

That's probably close enough for government work.

Scott Carpenter

For you, to the second.

CAPCOM

Roger. Still you indicate 1 second slow on g.e.t.; we indicate you on, on retrotime.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I am reading 04 32 34.

CAPCOM

Would you please exercise prior to your second blood pressure.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I'll give you the calibrated exercise at this time.

Scott Carpenter

Exercise start, now.

Scott Carpenter

Okay, blood pressure start, now. That was 60 cycles in 30 seconds on the exerciser.

CAPCOM

60 cycles in 30 seconds.

CAPCOM

Did you by any chance try T/M keying over the Cape on your last pass?

Scott Carpenter

I think I may have to mark time for tensiometer reading on the balloon.

CAPCOM

Understand you still have the balloon with you. It's possible if you go to deploy position and back to release, you can—

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I've tried that a number of times, Deke. I just can't get rid of it.

CAPCOM

Okay. Well, she'll probably come into your face on retrofire; but I'm sure you'll lose it shortly after that.

Scott Carpenter

Yeah, I figure. I hope so.

CAPCOM

Okay, for your information, cloud—is five-tenths and it's only one-eighth to the north over Port Moresby; so if you see some lights up in that area, we'd like to know about it.

Scott Carpenter

Roger, I'll let you know.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. C.e.t. on my mark will be 4 hours 1 minute, 35 seconds, stand by. MARK, 4 01 35.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on May 24, 1962, 4:46 p.m. UTC (57 years, 8 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

CAPCOM

Roger. Still one second off; that's fine.

CAPCOM

The flight plan calls for you to have a drink of water over here. Do you feel like you need one—

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I just, I have had three long drinks of water. The last one was, I think, about 10 minutes ago, Deke.

CAPCOM

You're probably loaded for bear, then.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. Deke, the haze layer is very bright. I would say 8 to 10 degrees above the real horizon. And I would say that the haze layer is about twice as high above the horizon as the—the bright blue band at sunset is; it's twice as thick. A star, stars are occluded as we pass through this haze layer. I have a good set of stars to watch going through at this time. I'll try and get some photometer readings.

CAPCOM

Roger. Understand. It's twice as—sunset.

Scott Carpenter

It is not twice as thick. It's thinner, but it is located at a distance about twice as far away as the top of the—the band at sunset.

Scott Carpenter

It's very narrow, and as bright as the horizon of the earth itself.

Scott Carpenter

This is a reading on Phecda in—in the Big Dipper prior to entry in the, the, into the haze layer. It occludes—it is extinct at roughly 2.5. The reticle extincts at 5.5. TM mark for the time in the middle of the haze layer. Spica—stand by.

CAPCOM

Aurora Seven, Aurora Seven, this Woomera Cap Com. How do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. Stand by, Woomera.

CAPCOM

Roger. Standing by.

Scott Carpenter

In the middle of the haze layer, Phecda will not—I can't even get a reading on it through the photometer. Phecda is now below the horizon, or below and mark about 5 seconds ago, now it emerged from the brightest part of the haze layer. It is now clearly visible. Woomera, my status is very good, fuel is 45 and 42 [percent]. Standby, I'll give you a full report very shortly.

CAPCOM

Roger. Standing by.

Scott Carpenter

Visor coming open.

CAPCOM

Roger. Visor open.

CAPCOM

Aurora Seven, this is Woomera. Do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger, Woomera, loud and clear.

CAPCOM

You say visor is open?

Scott Carpenter

That's negative. I did not open it. I won't open it until I get through with these readings. Phecda now extincts at 1.7 in the mid, in mid position between the haze layer and the earth. Okay, Woomera, my—my status is very good. The suit temperature is coming down substantially. Steam vent temperature is not down much, but the suit environment temperature is 60 [degrees]. I'm quite comfortable. Cabin temperature is 101 [degrees]; cabin is holding an indicated 4.8; oxygen is 75-100 [percent], all d-c power continues to be good, 20 Amps; both a-c busses are good; fuel reads 46 and 40 [percent]. I am in drifting flight. I have had plenty of water to drink. The visor is coming open now. And blood pressure is coming your way at this time.

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Woomera, Woomera Cap Com, this is Aurora Seven. Did you copy my last? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Cabin temperature, cabin water flow is all the way off and reducing back to about 7.5 now, a little bit less. At this time cabin steam vent going to record only.

Scott Carpenter

Cabin steam vent is 10; suit steam vent is 62. I would like to have a little bit more pad on the temperature, but I can't seem to get it. The suit temperature is 60 [degrees]; the cabin temperature continues at 102 [degrees]. I have 22 minutes and 20 seconds left for retrofire. I think that I will try to get some of this equipment stowed at this time.

Scott Carpenter

There is the moon.

Scott Carpenter

Looks no different—here than it does on the ground.

Scott Carpenter

Visor is open and the visor is coming closed now at this time.

Scott Carpenter

I have put the moon—in the center of the window and it just drifts very, very little.

Scott Carpenter

There seems to be a stagnant place in the, my helmet. The suit is cool, but along my face it's warm.

Scott Carpenter

And there is Scorpio.

Scott Carpenter

All right, let's see.

Scott Carpenter

It's very interesting to remark that my attitude—and the—is roughly pitchup plus 30 [degrees], roll right 130 [degrees], and yaw left 20 [degrees]. The balloon at this time is moving right along with me. It's keeping a constant bearing at all times. There is the horizon band again; this time from the moonlit side. Let me see, with the airglow filter, it's very difficult to do this because of the lights from that time correlation clock. Visor coming open now. It's impossible to get dark-adapted in here, with that light the way it is.

Scott Carpenter

All right for the record. Interesting, I believe. This haze layer is very bright through the airglow filter. Very bright. The time now is 4 17 44.

Scott Carpenter

Now, let me see, I'll get an accurate band width.

Scott Carpenter

That's very handy, because the band width—there is the sun … The horizon band width is exactly equal to the X. I can't explain it; I'll have to, to—

Scott Carpenter

Sunrise. Ahhhhh! Beautiful lighted fireflies that time. It was luminous that time. But it's only, okay, they—all right, I have—if anybody reads, I have the fireflies. They are very bright. They are capsule emanating. I can rap the hatch and stir off hundreds of them. Rap the side of the capsule; huge streams come out. They—some appear to glow. Let me yaw around the other way.

Scott Carpenter

Some appear to glow but I don't believe they really do; it's just the light of the sun. I'll try to get a picture of it. They're brilliant. I think they would really shine through 9 on the photometer. I'll rap. Let's see.

Scott Carpenter

Taking some pictures at F 2.8 and bulb. The pictures now, here, one of the balloon. The sun is too bright now. That's where they come from. They are little tiny white pieces of frost. I judge from this that the whole side of the capsule must have frost on it.

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven, this is Hawaii Com Tech, how do you read?

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Hawaii, loud and clear. How me?

Comm Tech

Seven, Hawaii Com Tech, I read you momentarily on UHF. How do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger, reading you loud and clear Hawaii. How me?

CAPCOM

Aurora Seven, Hawaii Cap Com. How do you read me?

Scott Carpenter

Roger, Do you read me or do you not, James?

CAPCOM

Gee, you are weak; but I read you. You are readable. Are you on UHF-Hi?