Scott Carpenter

First meal at 01 08 52.

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Canton Com Tech, Canton Com Tech, Aurora Seven on HF. How do you read?

Comm Tech

Seven, this is Canton Com Tech. Do you read?

Scott Carpenter

Canton Com Tech, Aurora Seven. Loud and clear. How do you read Aurora Seven on HF? Over.

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven, Aurora Seven. This is Canton Com Tech. Do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger, Canton Com Tech. Loud and clear. How me?

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven, Aurora Seven. This is Canton Com Tech. Do you read?

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Canton Com Tech, Canton Com Tech, Aurora Seven. Loud and clear. How me?

CAPCOM

This is Canton. Loud and clear, Aurora Seven. Can you begin with the short report?

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I've been reading you for some time. I've tried to contact you on HF with no success. My status is good; the capsule status is good; control mode is fly-by-wire; gyros caged; maneuver is off. The fuel reads 74-85 [percent]. Oxygen is 87-100 [percent]. The cabin temperature is a bit high at 104 [degrees]. The suit—steam vent temperature is 70 [degrees], and cabin is 80 [degrees], but I believe they're coming down. Over.

CAPCOM

Roger. Did you wish to check your attitude readings with our telemetry? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. My—my gyros are caged at this time. Stand by one.

CAPCOM

Standing by.

Scott Carpenter

I am beginning to pick up what I believe is a—yeah, it's very definitely a cloud pattern equally low.

Scott Carpenter

I am—let's see, Canton, do you have the exact sunrise time for the first orbit? Over.

CAPCOM

Say again, Aurora Seven.

Scott Carpenter

Sunrise time for first orbit. Over.

CAPCOM

I have a sunrise time of 1 plus 21 plus 00.

Scott Carpenter

1 plus 21 00. Roger. Thank you.

CAPCOM

Did you—could you comment on whether you are comfortable or not—would you . . . a 102 [degrees] on body temperature.

Scott Carpenter

No, I don't believe that's correct. My visor was open; it is now closed. I can't imagine I'm that hot. I'm quite comfortable, but sweating some.

CAPCOM

Roger. Can you confirm then that the faceplate is closed, and will be closed for the pass over Guaymas.

Scott Carpenter

That is correct, George. I'll leave the faceplate closed. I have had one piece of the inflight food. It's crumbling badly and I hate to get it all over, and I have had about four swallows of water at that time.

CAPCOM

Roger, four swallows of water.

CAPCOM

You wish to start your comment now on the haze layer—there was the . . . pitch, and at the same time confirm that the flight plan is on schedule.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. I cannot confirm that the flight plan is completely on schedule. At sunset I was unable to see a separate haze layer—the same—height above the horizon that John reported. I'll watch closely at sunrise and see if I can pick it up. Over.

CAPCOM

All readings appear to be normal down here. The capsule looks good from down here.

CAPCOM

. . . queries, you can continue on with your observations. Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. Thanks, George, see you next time around.

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Spoken on May 24, 1962, 2 p.m. UTC (55 years, 5 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

CAPCOM

Okay, Scott. Good luck.

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven, Hawaii Com Tech. How do you read me? Over.

Scott Carpenter

I am in VOX record now. I heard Hawaii calling, ha ha, Hawaii calling. I will go to transmit directly, and see if we can pick up Hawaii.

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Hawaii Com Tech, Aurora Seven on HF. Loud and clear. How me?

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Hawaii Com Tech, Hawaii Com Tech, Aurora Seven. Loud and clear. How do you read HF? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Going now to record only while I switch back to UHF.

Scott Carpenter

Hello, Hawaii, hello, Hawaii Com Tech, Aurora Seven. Weak but readable. Go ahead.

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven, Aurora Seven, . . . on HF, UHF. How do you read? Over.

Scott Carpenter

Roger. Hawaii Com Tech. Aurora Seven reading you loud and clear. How me?

Comm Tech

Aurora Seven. Hawaii Com Tech. How do you read?

Scott Carpenter

All right. My—I am at 01 19 02. Have been several times completely disoriented. There, I have Cassiopeia directly in the window and am yawing around for the sunrise—photographs. The sky is quite light in the east.

Note

Astronaut Carpenter stated that the disorientation was with respect to the earth, and this occurred only when no visual reference was available. However, he remained oriented with respect to the spacecraft. See footnote 4.

Scott Carpenter

Excess cabin-water light came on at that time. I'll have to go back all the way down and off. Suit is—still high. The cabin-water gage is reading—plus 9, which is hard to believe.

Scott Carpenter

My temperature, my body temperature doesn't feel . . . feel bad at all. My suit—yes, my suit temperature is down now, also.

Scott Carpenter

But the steam vent temperature is—still about—70 [degrees].

Scott Carpenter

I have the fireflies. Hello, Guaymas.

Scott Carpenter

I have the particles. I was facing away from the sun at sunrise and I did not see the particles—just—just yawing about—180 degrees, I was able to pick up—at this.—Stand by, I think I see more.

Scott Carpenter

Yes, there was one, random motions—some even appeared to be going ahead. There's one outside. Almost like a light snowflake particle caught in an eddy. They are not glowing with their own light at this time.

Scott Carpenter

It could be frost from a thruster.